Johannes Girardoni
Overview Description
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Girardoni’s light sculptures, referred to as “Peak Light Extractors” or “Refrequencers,” are a convergence of light and material, re-articulated into different physical forms. Made of cast-resin pieces back-lit with laser-engraved LED panels, these works appear to shift in color depending on the current light situation and the position and movement of the viewer. In “Peak Light Extractors," Girardoni measures and isolates the highest intensity light frequencies coming through the resin, which provide the analogous color information of the loosely articulated paint of the constructed plywood panels. "Refrequencers" use sensors to capture the light waveforms emanating from the resin, and digitally convert the light information into a sound vibration, making light audible.
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Girardoni’s light sculptures, referred to as “Peak Light Extractors” or “Refrequencers,” are a convergence of light and material, re-articulated into different physical forms. Made of cast-resin pieces back-lit with laser-engraved LED panels, these works appear to shift in color depending on the current light situation and the position and movement of the viewer. In “Peak Light Extractors," Girardoni measures and isolates the highest intensity light frequencies coming through the resin, which provide the analogous color information of the loosely articulated paint of the constructed plywood panels. "Refrequencers" use sensors to capture the light waveforms emanating from the resin, and digitally convert the light information into a sound vibration, making light audible.
Play sound
Girardoni’s light sculptures, referred to as “Peak Light Extractors” or “Refrequencers,” are a convergence of light and material, re-articulated into different physical forms. Made of cast-resin pieces back-lit with laser-engraved LED panels, these works appear to shift in color depending on the current light situation and the position and movement of the viewer. In “Peak Light Extractors," Girardoni measures and isolates the highest intensity light frequencies coming through the resin, which provide the analogous color information of the loosely articulated paint of the constructed plywood panels. "Refrequencers" use sensors to capture the light waveforms emanating from the resin, and digitally convert the light information into a sound vibration, making light audible.
Girardoni’s light sculptures, referred to as “Peak Light Extractors” or “Refrequencers,” are a convergence of light and material, re-articulated into different physical forms. Made of cast-resin pieces back-lit with laser-engraved LED panels, these works appear to shift in color depending on the current light situation and the position and movement of the viewer. In “Peak Light Extractors," Girardoni measures and isolates the highest intensity light frequencies coming through the resin, which provide the analogous color information of the loosely articulated paint of the constructed plywood panels. "Refrequencers" use sensors to capture the light waveforms emanating from the resin, and digitally convert the light information into a sound vibration, making light audible.
Girardoni’s light sculptures, referred to as “Peak Light Extractors” or “Refrequencers,” are a convergence of light and material, re-articulated into different physical forms. Made of cast-resin pieces back-lit with laser-engraved LED panels, these works appear to shift in color depending on the current light situation and the position and movement of the viewer. In “Peak Light Extractors," Girardoni measures and isolates the highest intensity light frequencies coming through the resin, which provide the analogous color information of the loosely articulated paint of the constructed plywood panels. "Refrequencers" use sensors to capture the light waveforms emanating from the resin, and digitally convert the light information into a sound vibration, making light audible.
Girardoni’s light sculptures, referred to as “Peak Light Extractors” or “Refrequencers,” are a convergence of light and material, re-articulated into different physical forms. Made of cast-resin pieces back-lit with laser-engraved LED panels, these works appear to shift in color depending on the current light situation and the position and movement of the viewer. In “Peak Light Extractors," Girardoni measures and isolates the highest intensity light frequencies coming through the resin, which provide the analogous color information of the loosely articulated paint of the constructed plywood panels. "Refrequencers" use sensors to capture the light waveforms emanating from the resin, and digitally convert the light information into a sound vibration, making light audible.
Girardoni’s light sculptures, referred to as “Peak Light Extractors” or “Refrequencers,” are a convergence of light and material, re-articulated into different physical forms. Made of cast-resin pieces back-lit with laser-engraved LED panels, these works appear to shift in color depending on the current light situation and the position and movement of the viewer. In “Peak Light Extractors," Girardoni measures and isolates the highest intensity light frequencies coming through the resin, which provide the analogous color information of the loosely articulated paint of the constructed plywood panels. "Refrequencers" use sensors to capture the light waveforms emanating from the resin, and digitally convert the light information into a sound vibration, making light audible.
Girardoni’s light sculptures, referred to as “Peak Light Extractors” or “Refrequencers,” are a convergence of light and material, re-articulated into different physical forms. Made of cast-resin pieces back-lit with laser-engraved LED panels, these works appear to shift in color depending on the current light situation and the position and movement of the viewer. In “Peak Light Extractors," Girardoni measures and isolates the highest intensity light frequencies coming through the resin, which provide the analogous color information of the loosely articulated paint of the constructed plywood panels. "Refrequencers" use sensors to capture the light waveforms emanating from the resin, and digitally convert the light information into a sound vibration, making light audible.
Girardoni’s light sculptures, referred to as “Peak Light Extractors” or “Refrequencers,” are a convergence of light and material, re-articulated into different physical forms. Made of cast-resin pieces back-lit with laser-engraved LED panels, these works appear to shift in color depending on the current light situation and the position and movement of the viewer. In “Peak Light Extractors," Girardoni measures and isolates the highest intensity light frequencies coming through the resin, which provide the analogous color information of the loosely articulated paint of the constructed plywood panels. "Refrequencers" use sensors to capture the light waveforms emanating from the resin, and digitally convert the light information into a sound vibration, making light audible.
A new series of over-painted photos, titled Exposed Icons, expands the exploration of light and material into conceptually new territory. The subject of the photographs is advertising billboards; Girardoni collects images of billboards in urban and rural settings and exposes their hidden, mostly unseen side, subverting advertising’s role as contemporary iconography. He reveals their structure by photo-graphing the billboards from behind, or documenting them during the transient state when they are blank. The artist first overlays multiple exposures of the same billboard, and then systematically builds and un-builds each work by digitally deconstructing and physically over-painting the photograph. These works question the integrity of the photograph as a carrier of archived information by manipulating their content; image sections are removed, replaced with "digital pigment," and juxtaposed to the material paint applied over the photograph. The paint on top of the image — which the artist refers to as “flat sculpture” — functions in physical space and is in direct dialogue with adjacent, digitally altered information, blurring the boundary between virtual and material content. By bridging the two, the virtual information of the photograph and the physical structure of the paint are compressed into a single pictorial architecture. The artist removes and conceals areas of each image, while leaving other parts open, suspending the work in a constant shift between what is perceived as virtual and what is perceived as real, what is present and what is absent, and what is and is not the subject. The work’s center remains undisclosed, engaging the viewer with the task of completing it.
A new series of over-painted photos, titled Exposed Icons, expands the exploration of light and material into conceptually new territory. The subject of the photographs is advertising billboards; Girardoni collects images of billboards in urban and rural settings and exposes their hidden, mostly unseen side, subverting advertising’s role as contemporary iconography. He reveals their structure by photo-graphing the billboards from behind, or documenting them during the transient state when they are blank. The artist first overlays multiple exposures of the same billboard, and then systematically builds and un-builds each work by digitally deconstructing and physically over-painting the photograph. These works question the integrity of the photograph as a carrier of archived information by manipulating their content; image sections are removed, replaced with "digital pigment," and juxtaposed to the material paint applied over the photograph. The paint on top of the image — which the artist refers to as “flat sculpture” — functions in physical space and is in direct dialogue with adjacent, digitally altered information, blurring the boundary between virtual and material content. By bridging the two, the virtual information of the photograph and the physical structure of the paint are compressed into a single pictorial architecture. The artist removes and conceals areas of each image, while leaving other parts open, suspending the work in a constant shift between what is perceived as virtual and what is perceived as real, what is present and what is absent, and what is and is not the subject. The work’s center remains undisclosed, engaging the viewer with the task of completing it.
A new series of over-painted photos, titled Exposed Icons, expands the exploration of light and material into conceptually new territory. The subject of the photographs is advertising billboards; Girardoni collects images of billboards in urban and rural settings and exposes their hidden, mostly unseen side, subverting advertising’s role as contemporary iconography. He reveals their structure by photo-graphing the billboards from behind, or documenting them during the transient state when they are blank. The artist first overlays multiple exposures of the same billboard, and then systematically builds and un-builds each work by digitally deconstructing and physically over-painting the photograph. These works question the integrity of the photograph as a carrier of archived information by manipulating their content; image sections are removed, replaced with "digital pigment," and juxtaposed to the material paint applied over the photograph. The paint on top of the image — which the artist refers to as “flat sculpture” — functions in physical space and is in direct dialogue with adjacent, digitally altered information, blurring the boundary between virtual and material content. By bridging the two, the virtual information of the photograph and the physical structure of the paint are compressed into a single pictorial architecture. The artist removes and conceals areas of each image, while leaving other parts open, suspending the work in a constant shift between what is perceived as virtual and what is perceived as real, what is present and what is absent, and what is and is not the subject. The work’s center remains undisclosed, engaging the viewer with the task of completing it.
A new series of over-painted photos, titled Exposed Icons, expands the exploration of light and material into conceptually new territory. The subject of the photographs is advertising billboards; Girardoni collects images of billboards in urban and rural settings and exposes their hidden, mostly unseen side, subverting advertising’s role as contemporary iconography. He reveals their structure by photo-graphing the billboards from behind, or documenting them during the transient state when they are blank. The artist first overlays multiple exposures of the same billboard, and then systematically builds and un-builds each work by digitally deconstructing and physically over-painting the photograph. These works question the integrity of the photograph as a carrier of archived information by manipulating their content; image sections are removed, replaced with "digital pigment," and juxtaposed to the material paint applied over the photograph. The paint on top of the image — which the artist refers to as “flat sculpture” — functions in physical space and is in direct dialogue with adjacent, digitally altered information, blurring the boundary between virtual and material content. By bridging the two, the virtual information of the photograph and the physical structure of the paint are compressed into a single pictorial architecture. The artist removes and conceals areas of each image, while leaving other parts open, suspending the work in a constant shift between what is perceived as virtual and what is perceived as real, what is present and what is absent, and what is and is not the subject. The work’s center remains undisclosed, engaging the viewer with the task of completing it.
A new series of over-painted photos, titled Exposed Icons, expands the exploration of light and material into conceptually new territory. The subject of the photographs is advertising billboards; Girardoni collects images of billboards in urban and rural settings and exposes their hidden, mostly unseen side, subverting advertising’s role as contemporary iconography. He reveals their structure by photo-graphing the billboards from behind, or documenting them during the transient state when they are blank. The artist first overlays multiple exposures of the same billboard, and then systematically builds and un-builds each work by digitally deconstructing and physically over-painting the photograph. These works question the integrity of the photograph as a carrier of archived information by manipulating their content; image sections are removed, replaced with "digital pigment," and juxtaposed to the material paint applied over the photograph. The paint on top of the image — which the artist refers to as “flat sculpture” — functions in physical space and is in direct dialogue with adjacent, digitally altered information, blurring the boundary between virtual and material content. By bridging the two, the virtual information of the photograph and the physical structure of the paint are compressed into a single pictorial architecture. The artist removes and conceals areas of each image, while leaving other parts open, suspending the work in a constant shift between what is perceived as virtual and what is perceived as real, what is present and what is absent, and what is and is not the subject. The work’s center remains undisclosed, engaging the viewer with the task of completing it.
A new series of over-painted photos, titled Exposed Icons, expands the exploration of light and material into conceptually new territory. The subject of the photographs is advertising billboards; Girardoni collects images of billboards in urban and rural settings and exposes their hidden, mostly unseen side, subverting advertising’s role as contemporary iconography. He reveals their structure by photo-graphing the billboards from behind, or documenting them during the transient state when they are blank. The artist first overlays multiple exposures of the same billboard, and then systematically builds and un-builds each work by digitally deconstructing and physically over-painting the photograph. These works question the integrity of the photograph as a carrier of archived information by manipulating their content; image sections are removed, replaced with "digital pigment," and juxtaposed to the material paint applied over the photograph. The paint on top of the image — which the artist refers to as “flat sculpture” — functions in physical space and is in direct dialogue with adjacent, digitally altered information, blurring the boundary between virtual and material content. By bridging the two, the virtual information of the photograph and the physical structure of the paint are compressed into a single pictorial architecture. The artist removes and conceals areas of each image, while leaving other parts open, suspending the work in a constant shift between what is perceived as virtual and what is perceived as real, what is present and what is absent, and what is and is not the subject. The work’s center remains undisclosed, engaging the viewer with the task of completing it.
A new series of over-painted photos, titled Exposed Icons, expands the exploration of light and material into conceptually new territory. The subject of the photographs is advertising billboards; Girardoni collects images of billboards in urban and rural settings and exposes their hidden, mostly unseen side, subverting advertising’s role as contemporary iconography. He reveals their structure by photo-graphing the billboards from behind, or documenting them during the transient state when they are blank. The artist first overlays multiple exposures of the same billboard, and then systematically builds and un-builds each work by digitally deconstructing and physically over-painting the photograph. These works question the integrity of the photograph as a carrier of archived information by manipulating their content; image sections are removed, replaced with "digital pigment," and juxtaposed to the material paint applied over the photograph. The paint on top of the image — which the artist refers to as “flat sculpture” — functions in physical space and is in direct dialogue with adjacent, digitally altered information, blurring the boundary between virtual and material content. By bridging the two, the virtual information of the photograph and the physical structure of the paint are compressed into a single pictorial architecture. The artist removes and conceals areas of each image, while leaving other parts open, suspending the work in a constant shift between what is perceived as virtual and what is perceived as real, what is present and what is absent, and what is and is not the subject. The work’s center remains undisclosed, engaging the viewer with the task of completing it.
A new series of over-painted photos, titled Exposed Icons, expands the exploration of light and material into conceptually new territory. The subject of the photographs is advertising billboards; Girardoni collects images of billboards in urban and rural settings and exposes their hidden, mostly unseen side, subverting advertising’s role as contemporary iconography. He reveals their structure by photo-graphing the billboards from behind, or documenting them during the transient state when they are blank. The artist first overlays multiple exposures of the same billboard, and then systematically builds and un-builds each work by digitally deconstructing and physically over-painting the photograph. These works question the integrity of the photograph as a carrier of archived information by manipulating their content; image sections are removed, replaced with "digital pigment," and juxtaposed to the material paint applied over the photograph. The paint on top of the image — which the artist refers to as “flat sculpture” — functions in physical space and is in direct dialogue with adjacent, digitally altered information, blurring the boundary between virtual and material content. By bridging the two, the virtual information of the photograph and the physical structure of the paint are compressed into a single pictorial architecture. The artist removes and conceals areas of each image, while leaving other parts open, suspending the work in a constant shift between what is perceived as virtual and what is perceived as real, what is present and what is absent, and what is and is not the subject. The work’s center remains undisclosed, engaging the viewer with the task of completing it.
A new series of over-painted photos, titled Exposed Icons, expands the exploration of light and material into conceptually new territory. The subject of the photographs is advertising billboards; Girardoni collects images of billboards in urban and rural settings and exposes their hidden, mostly unseen side, subverting advertising’s role as contemporary iconography. He reveals their structure by photo-graphing the billboards from behind, or documenting them during the transient state when they are blank. The artist first overlays multiple exposures of the same billboard, and then systematically builds and un-builds each work by digitally deconstructing and physically over-painting the photograph. These works question the integrity of the photograph as a carrier of archived information by manipulating their content; image sections are removed, replaced with "digital pigment," and juxtaposed to the material paint applied over the photograph. The paint on top of the image — which the artist refers to as “flat sculpture” — functions in physical space and is in direct dialogue with adjacent, digitally altered information, blurring the boundary between virtual and material content. By bridging the two, the virtual information of the photograph and the physical structure of the paint are compressed into a single pictorial architecture. The artist removes and conceals areas of each image, while leaving other parts open, suspending the work in a constant shift between what is perceived as virtual and what is perceived as real, what is present and what is absent, and what is and is not the subject. The work’s center remains undisclosed, engaging the viewer with the task of completing it.
A new series of over-painted photos, titled Exposed Icons, expands the exploration of light and material into conceptually new territory. The subject of the photographs is advertising billboards; Girardoni collects images of billboards in urban and rural settings and exposes their hidden, mostly unseen side, subverting advertising’s role as contemporary iconography. He reveals their structure by photo-graphing the billboards from behind, or documenting them during the transient state when they are blank. The artist first overlays multiple exposures of the same billboard, and then systematically builds and un-builds each work by digitally deconstructing and physically over-painting the photograph. These works question the integrity of the photograph as a carrier of archived information by manipulating their content; image sections are removed, replaced with "digital pigment," and juxtaposed to the material paint applied over the photograph. The paint on top of the image — which the artist refers to as “flat sculpture” — functions in physical space and is in direct dialogue with adjacent, digitally altered information, blurring the boundary between virtual and material content. By bridging the two, the virtual information of the photograph and the physical structure of the paint are compressed into a single pictorial architecture. The artist removes and conceals areas of each image, while leaving other parts open, suspending the work in a constant shift between what is perceived as virtual and what is perceived as real, what is present and what is absent, and what is and is not the subject. The work’s center remains undisclosed, engaging the viewer with the task of completing it.
A new series of over-painted photos, titled Exposed Icons, expands the exploration of light and material into conceptually new territory. The subject of the photographs is advertising billboards; Girardoni collects images of billboards in urban and rural settings and exposes their hidden, mostly unseen side, subverting advertising’s role as contemporary iconography. He reveals their structure by photo-graphing the billboards from behind, or documenting them during the transient state when they are blank. The artist first overlays multiple exposures of the same billboard, and then systematically builds and un-builds each work by digitally deconstructing and physically over-painting the photograph. These works question the integrity of the photograph as a carrier of archived information by manipulating their content; image sections are removed, replaced with "digital pigment," and juxtaposed to the material paint applied over the photograph. The paint on top of the image — which the artist refers to as “flat sculpture” — functions in physical space and is in direct dialogue with adjacent, digitally altered information, blurring the boundary between virtual and material content. By bridging the two, the virtual information of the photograph and the physical structure of the paint are compressed into a single pictorial architecture. The artist removes and conceals areas of each image, while leaving other parts open, suspending the work in a constant shift between what is perceived as virtual and what is perceived as real, what is present and what is absent, and what is and is not the subject. The work’s center remains undisclosed, engaging the viewer with the task of completing it.
A new series of over-painted photos, titled Exposed Icons, expands the exploration of light and material into conceptually new territory. The subject of the photographs is advertising billboards; Girardoni collects images of billboards in urban and rural settings and exposes their hidden, mostly unseen side, subverting advertising’s role as contemporary iconography. He reveals their structure by photo-graphing the billboards from behind, or documenting them during the transient state when they are blank. The artist first overlays multiple exposures of the same billboard, and then systematically builds and un-builds each work by digitally deconstructing and physically over-painting the photograph. These works question the integrity of the photograph as a carrier of archived information by manipulating their content; image sections are removed, replaced with "digital pigment," and juxtaposed to the material paint applied over the photograph. The paint on top of the image — which the artist refers to as “flat sculpture” — functions in physical space and is in direct dialogue with adjacent, digitally altered information, blurring the boundary between virtual and material content. By bridging the two, the virtual information of the photograph and the physical structure of the paint are compressed into a single pictorial architecture. The artist removes and conceals areas of each image, while leaving other parts open, suspending the work in a constant shift between what is perceived as virtual and what is perceived as real, what is present and what is absent, and what is and is not the subject. The work’s center remains undisclosed, engaging the viewer with the task of completing it.
A new series of over-painted photos, titled Exposed Icons, expands the exploration of light and material into conceptually new territory. The subject of the photographs is advertising billboards; Girardoni collects images of billboards in urban and rural settings and exposes their hidden, mostly unseen side, subverting advertising’s role as contemporary iconography. He reveals their structure by photo-graphing the billboards from behind, or documenting them during the transient state when they are blank. The artist first overlays multiple exposures of the same billboard, and then systematically builds and un-builds each work by digitally deconstructing and physically over-painting the photograph. These works question the integrity of the photograph as a carrier of archived information by manipulating their content; image sections are removed, replaced with "digital pigment," and juxtaposed to the material paint applied over the photograph. The paint on top of the image — which the artist refers to as “flat sculpture” — functions in physical space and is in direct dialogue with adjacent, digitally altered information, blurring the boundary between virtual and material content. By bridging the two, the virtual information of the photograph and the physical structure of the paint are compressed into a single pictorial architecture. The artist removes and conceals areas of each image, while leaving other parts open, suspending the work in a constant shift between what is perceived as virtual and what is perceived as real, what is present and what is absent, and what is and is not the subject. The work’s center remains undisclosed, engaging the viewer with the task of completing it.
A new series of over-painted photos, titled Exposed Icons, expands the exploration of light and material into conceptually new territory. The subject of the photographs is advertising billboards; Girardoni collects images of billboards in urban and rural settings and exposes their hidden, mostly unseen side, subverting advertising’s role as contemporary iconography. He reveals their structure by photo-graphing the billboards from behind, or documenting them during the transient state when they are blank. The artist first overlays multiple exposures of the same billboard, and then systematically builds and un-builds each work by digitally deconstructing and physically over-painting the photograph. These works question the integrity of the photograph as a carrier of archived information by manipulating their content; image sections are removed, replaced with "digital pigment," and juxtaposed to the material paint applied over the photograph. The paint on top of the image — which the artist refers to as “flat sculpture” — functions in physical space and is in direct dialogue with adjacent, digitally altered information, blurring the boundary between virtual and material content. By bridging the two, the virtual information of the photograph and the physical structure of the paint are compressed into a single pictorial architecture. The artist removes and conceals areas of each image, while leaving other parts open, suspending the work in a constant shift between what is perceived as virtual and what is perceived as real, what is present and what is absent, and what is and is not the subject. The work’s center remains undisclosed, engaging the viewer with the task of completing it.
A new series of over-painted photos, titled Exposed Icons, expands the exploration of light and material into conceptually new territory. The subject of the photographs is advertising billboards; Girardoni collects images of billboards in urban and rural settings and exposes their hidden, mostly unseen side, subverting advertising’s role as contemporary iconography. He reveals their structure by photo-graphing the billboards from behind, or documenting them during the transient state when they are blank. The artist first overlays multiple exposures of the same billboard, and then systematically builds and un-builds each work by digitally deconstructing and physically over-painting the photograph. These works question the integrity of the photograph as a carrier of archived information by manipulating their content; image sections are removed, replaced with "digital pigment," and juxtaposed to the material paint applied over the photograph. The paint on top of the image — which the artist refers to as “flat sculpture” — functions in physical space and is in direct dialogue with adjacent, digitally altered information, blurring the boundary between virtual and material content. By bridging the two, the virtual information of the photograph and the physical structure of the paint are compressed into a single pictorial architecture. The artist removes and conceals areas of each image, while leaving other parts open, suspending the work in a constant shift between what is perceived as virtual and what is perceived as real, what is present and what is absent, and what is and is not the subject. The work’s center remains undisclosed, engaging the viewer with the task of completing it.
A new series of over-painted photos, titled Exposed Icons, expands the exploration of light and material into conceptually new territory. The subject of the photographs is advertising billboards; Girardoni collects images of billboards in urban and rural settings and exposes their hidden, mostly unseen side, subverting advertising’s role as contemporary iconography. He reveals their structure by photo-graphing the billboards from behind, or documenting them during the transient state when they are blank. The artist first overlays multiple exposures of the same billboard, and then systematically builds and un-builds each work by digitally deconstructing and physically over-painting the photograph. These works question the integrity of the photograph as a carrier of archived information by manipulating their content; image sections are removed, replaced with "digital pigment," and juxtaposed to the material paint applied over the photograph. The paint on top of the image — which the artist refers to as “flat sculpture” — functions in physical space and is in direct dialogue with adjacent, digitally altered information, blurring the boundary between virtual and material content. By bridging the two, the virtual information of the photograph and the physical structure of the paint are compressed into a single pictorial architecture. The artist removes and conceals areas of each image, while leaving other parts open, suspending the work in a constant shift between what is perceived as virtual and what is perceived as real, what is present and what is absent, and what is and is not the subject. The work’s center remains undisclosed, engaging the viewer with the task of completing it.
A new series of over-painted photos, titled Exposed Icons, expands the exploration of light and material into conceptually new territory. The subject of the photographs is advertising billboards; Girardoni collects images of billboards in urban and rural settings and exposes their hidden, mostly unseen side, subverting advertising’s role as contemporary iconography. He reveals their structure by photo-graphing the billboards from behind, or documenting them during the transient state when they are blank. The artist first overlays multiple exposures of the same billboard, and then systematically builds and un-builds each work by digitally deconstructing and physically over-painting the photograph. These works question the integrity of the photograph as a carrier of archived information by manipulating their content; image sections are removed, replaced with "digital pigment," and juxtaposed to the material paint applied over the photograph. The paint on top of the image — which the artist refers to as “flat sculpture” — functions in physical space and is in direct dialogue with adjacent, digitally altered information, blurring the boundary between virtual and material content. By bridging the two, the virtual information of the photograph and the physical structure of the paint are compressed into a single pictorial architecture. The artist removes and conceals areas of each image, while leaving other parts open, suspending the work in a constant shift between what is perceived as virtual and what is perceived as real, what is present and what is absent, and what is and is not the subject. The work’s center remains undisclosed, engaging the viewer with the task of completing it.
A new series of over-painted photos, titled Exposed Icons, expands the exploration of light and material into conceptually new territory. The subject of the photographs is advertising billboards; Girardoni collects images of billboards in urban and rural settings and exposes their hidden, mostly unseen side, subverting advertising’s role as contemporary iconography. He reveals their structure by photo-graphing the billboards from behind, or documenting them during the transient state when they are blank. The artist first overlays multiple exposures of the same billboard, and then systematically builds and un-builds each work by digitally deconstructing and physically over-painting the photograph. These works question the integrity of the photograph as a carrier of archived information by manipulating their content; image sections are removed, replaced with "digital pigment," and juxtaposed to the material paint applied over the photograph. The paint on top of the image — which the artist refers to as “flat sculpture” — functions in physical space and is in direct dialogue with adjacent, digitally altered information, blurring the boundary between virtual and material content. By bridging the two, the virtual information of the photograph and the physical structure of the paint are compressed into a single pictorial architecture. The artist removes and conceals areas of each image, while leaving other parts open, suspending the work in a constant shift between what is perceived as virtual and what is perceived as real, what is present and what is absent, and what is and is not the subject. The work’s center remains undisclosed, engaging the viewer with the task of completing it.
A new series of over-painted photos, titled Exposed Icons, expands the exploration of light and material into conceptually new territory. The subject of the photographs is advertising billboards; Girardoni collects images of billboards in urban and rural settings and exposes their hidden, mostly unseen side, subverting advertising’s role as contemporary iconography. He reveals their structure by photo-graphing the billboards from behind, or documenting them during the transient state when they are blank. The artist first overlays multiple exposures of the same billboard, and then systematically builds and un-builds each work by digitally deconstructing and physically over-painting the photograph. These works question the integrity of the photograph as a carrier of archived information by manipulating their content; image sections are removed, replaced with "digital pigment," and juxtaposed to the material paint applied over the photograph. The paint on top of the image — which the artist refers to as “flat sculpture” — functions in physical space and is in direct dialogue with adjacent, digitally altered information, blurring the boundary between virtual and material content. By bridging the two, the virtual information of the photograph and the physical structure of the paint are compressed into a single pictorial architecture. The artist removes and conceals areas of each image, while leaving other parts open, suspending the work in a constant shift between what is perceived as virtual and what is perceived as real, what is present and what is absent, and what is and is not the subject. The work’s center remains undisclosed, engaging the viewer with the task of completing it.
A new series of over-painted photos, titled Exposed Icons, expands the exploration of light and material into conceptually new territory. The subject of the photographs is advertising billboards; Girardoni collects images of billboards in urban and rural settings and exposes their hidden, mostly unseen side, subverting advertising’s role as contemporary iconography. He reveals their structure by photo-graphing the billboards from behind, or documenting them during the transient state when they are blank. The artist first overlays multiple exposures of the same billboard, and then systematically builds and un-builds each work by digitally deconstructing and physically over-painting the photograph. These works question the integrity of the photograph as a carrier of archived information by manipulating their content; image sections are removed, replaced with "digital pigment," and juxtaposed to the material paint applied over the photograph. The paint on top of the image — which the artist refers to as “flat sculpture” — functions in physical space and is in direct dialogue with adjacent, digitally altered information, blurring the boundary between virtual and material content. By bridging the two, the virtual information of the photograph and the physical structure of the paint are compressed into a single pictorial architecture. The artist removes and conceals areas of each image, while leaving other parts open, suspending the work in a constant shift between what is perceived as virtual and what is perceived as real, what is present and what is absent, and what is and is not the subject. The work’s center remains undisclosed, engaging the viewer with the task of completing it.

Metaspace V2 is a monumental sculpture in which visitors enter and participate in an immersive color-soundscape based on the frequencies captured by embedded sensors. The sensors respond to the presence of bodies, creating a feedback loop between visitor and work as the environment continually evolves. A raw aluminum shell provides the framework for the sculpture’s seamless interior, the curvilinear form scattering the colored light inside. Girardoni’s Spectro-Sonic Refrequencers convert the light waves projected through a resin lens at the top of the sculpture into sound vibrations that shift as the light conditions change, which is also effected by movement within the space. Metaspace V2 is a space about space. It challenges our understanding of space and perception, questioning the border between the organic and the artificial in our increasingly technologically dominated existence. Girardoni was driven to rigorously investigate these ideas in his work after traveling to West Africa. The following is an excerpt from the artist’s essay in a forthcoming publication Time Space Existence, from GAAP/Cornerhouse Books.

"Coming back from Mali, I was continually reminded how our culture is saturated by digital systems. We use our phone’s intelligence to get us to the right place. That alone, has shifted how we understand and read our environment. The algorithm behind Google searches detects behavioral patterns, the sum of which yields a digital identity that knows more about us than our friends; or worse, more than we know about ourselves. We make decisions based on information provided by algorithms. My focus on the interaction of light and material brought me to the idea of reality augmentation in art. With the use of sensors and tone generators, I could use an algorithm to make light audible and push the whole paradigm of phenomenological art into the current context. If we are experiencing a work by James Turrell or Robert Irwin, for example, we encounter perception in its purest form. We experience ourselves sensing. Even now, artists like Olafur Eliasson work with perception as the medium itself. The whole history of art culminates there. As with the “death of painting,” however, there is no end. The evolution, and this is where we break with history, is that we are now occupying a cultural condition in which we are not the only ones sensing. Artificial perception extends our own sensory apparatus at large and creates a new reality. An environment that we sense while it also senses us, and then changes as a result, heralds the end of the supremacy of our perception. This is the new now."

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The (Dis)appearance of Everything is an interactive installation that explores the convergence of physical material and light by rearticulating light as sound through Spectro-Sonic refrequencing. The installation’s architecture questions the limits of perception and activates the border area of natural phenomena and digital systems. Natural and artificial light merges inside five cast resin elements that appear to subtly shift in color and luminosity depending on the viewer’s position within the space. Two sensors, calibrated to measure both purple and daylight frequencies, drive a tone generator which converts the frequencies of light into frequencies of sound, making light audible. The sensors also register the presence of the viewer moving through the space, which additionally modulates the sound. In this set-up, virtual and physical information is processed both by the viewer and the work, further blurring the boundary between phenomenological and virtual events.
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The Passage Room is a site-specific light and sound installation, which investigates the boundary between manufactured states and perceptual events. It is an architectural intervention of the main exhibition hall of the Raimund Abraham designed Austrian Cultural Forum New York, a space limited by its extremely narrow footprint. The installation is devised as a metaphor for the migratory process, configured for visitors to be drawn into its center and physically move through the installation. The Passage Room creates an immersive environment by compressing physical and virtual manipulations of light and sound within a spatial setting.

The installation is devised with two offset, parallel scrim walls that intersect the space midway, perpendicularly redoubling the narrow layout of the space and compressing its focal point to a passage at its center. The translucent walls, flooded with purple light emanating from LEDs at the installation’s midpoint, forms a constricted “passage room” which stages spectators as part of the sculpture. When viewed on approach, the narrow passage gently veils its interior, revealing everything and everyone in it. However, while inside, the scrims appear as opaque fields of color and the space outside the scrims becomes obscured. Viewers become participants, and participants become performers, blurring the boundary between subject and object, seeing and being seen. Passing through the installation, visual planes open and close depending on the viewers’ position within the work, creating a constantly shifting experience. A modulating sound field, generated by the light, is superimposed onto the works layered setting. The LEDs at the center of the installation emit wavelengths of light from opposite ends of the visible spectrum — red and blue — which are experienced as purple, a non-spectral color. Based on scientific method and an algorithmic conversion, the electromagnetic waves of red and blue light are transposed onto mechanical waves of sound, rearticulating light waves into sound waves, making purple audible. The Passage Room’s physical and virtual architecture explore the limits of our sensory apparatus through an interface of digitally reconfigured information and naturally occurring perceptual phenomena.

Light Reactive Organic Sculptures comprise an extensive body of work that has evolved over the past two decades. The work focuses on reductive investigations at the intersection of sculpture and painting, and explores the continuously shifting relationship between light and material. Despite an elemental material vocabulary — found wood, beeswax and pigment — the work’s physical constellation becomes both the carrier of an explicitly painterly event, while also being the foundation of an immaterial phenomenon. The pieces are often examinations of phenomenological processes, where a hollow or empty space — a tangible emptiness — turns out to be the actual center of the work. Opposites and contradictions, as well as the complex dialectic between them, are the fundamental themes. The orchestration of material and light, presence and absence, things found and things formed, all resist clear fixation, thereby maintaining and creating works with their own non-derivable reality.

The primary material organization is found wood that forms the base for color built with pigment and beeswax. The wood is harvested from urban debris at building constructions and deconstructions, and in its worn and deteriorated condition, creates an instant history. These structures become the foundation for an architecture of color in which the material is color, and the color is material. Built by suspending varying degrees of pigment in layer over thin layer of beeswax, light travels into the wax and encircles the pigment. This results in light reactivity, and juxtaposed to the static, aged structure of the wood, the sculptures’ pigmented wax evolves and adapts to changing ambient light situations. These sculptures hold light.
Light Reactive Organic Sculptures comprise an extensive body of work that has evolved over the past two decades. The work focuses on reductive investigations at the intersection of sculpture and painting, and explores the continuously shifting relationship between light and material. Despite an elemental material vocabulary — found wood, beeswax and pigment — the work’s physical constellation becomes both the carrier of an explicitly painterly event, while also being the foundation of an immaterial phenomenon. The pieces are often examinations of phenomenological processes, where a hollow or empty space — a tangible emptiness — turns out to be the actual center of the work. Opposites and contradictions, as well as the complex dialectic between them, are the fundamental themes. The orchestration of material and light, presence and absence, things found and things formed, all resist clear fixation, thereby maintaining and creating works with their own non-derivable reality.

The primary material organization is found wood that forms the base for color built with pigment and beeswax. The wood is harvested from urban debris at building constructions and deconstructions, and in its worn and deteriorated condition, creates an instant history. These structures become the foundation for an architecture of color in which the material is color, and the color is material. Built by suspending varying degrees of pigment in layer over thin layer of beeswax, light travels into the wax and encircles the pigment. This results in light reactivity, and juxtaposed to the static, aged structure of the wood, the sculptures’ pigmented wax evolves and adapts to changing ambient light situations. These sculptures hold light.
Light Reactive Organic Sculptures comprise an extensive body of work that has evolved over the past two decades. The work focuses on reductive investigations at the intersection of sculpture and painting, and explores the continuously shifting relationship between light and material. Despite an elemental material vocabulary — found wood, beeswax and pigment — the work’s physical constellation becomes both the carrier of an explicitly painterly event, while also being the foundation of an immaterial phenomenon. The pieces are often examinations of phenomenological processes, where a hollow or empty space — a tangible emptiness — turns out to be the actual center of the work. Opposites and contradictions, as well as the complex dialectic between them, are the fundamental themes. The orchestration of material and light, presence and absence, things found and things formed, all resist clear fixation, thereby maintaining and creating works with their own non-derivable reality.

The primary material organization is found wood that forms the base for color built with pigment and beeswax. The wood is harvested from urban debris at building constructions and deconstructions, and in its worn and deteriorated condition, creates an instant history. These structures become the foundation for an architecture of color in which the material is color, and the color is material. Built by suspending varying degrees of pigment in layer over thin layer of beeswax, light travels into the wax and encircles the pigment. This results in light reactivity, and juxtaposed to the static, aged structure of the wood, the sculptures’ pigmented wax evolves and adapts to changing ambient light situations. These sculptures hold light.
Light Reactive Organic Sculptures comprise an extensive body of work that has evolved over the past two decades. The work focuses on reductive investigations at the intersection of sculpture and painting, and explores the continuously shifting relationship between light and material. Despite an elemental material vocabulary — found wood, beeswax and pigment — the work’s physical constellation becomes both the carrier of an explicitly painterly event, while also being the foundation of an immaterial phenomenon. The pieces are often examinations of phenomenological processes, where a hollow or empty space — a tangible emptiness — turns out to be the actual center of the work. Opposites and contradictions, as well as the complex dialectic between them, are the fundamental themes. The orchestration of material and light, presence and absence, things found and things formed, all resist clear fixation, thereby maintaining and creating works with their own non-derivable reality.

The primary material organization is found wood that forms the base for color built with pigment and beeswax. The wood is harvested from urban debris at building constructions and deconstructions, and in its worn and deteriorated condition, creates an instant history. These structures become the foundation for an architecture of color in which the material is color, and the color is material. Built by suspending varying degrees of pigment in layer over thin layer of beeswax, light travels into the wax and encircles the pigment. This results in light reactivity, and juxtaposed to the static, aged structure of the wood, the sculptures’ pigmented wax evolves and adapts to changing ambient light situations. These sculptures hold light.
Light Reactive Organic Sculptures comprise an extensive body of work that has evolved over the past two decades. The work focuses on reductive investigations at the intersection of sculpture and painting, and explores the continuously shifting relationship between light and material. Despite an elemental material vocabulary — found wood, beeswax and pigment — the work’s physical constellation becomes both the carrier of an explicitly painterly event, while also being the foundation of an immaterial phenomenon. The pieces are often examinations of phenomenological processes, where a hollow or empty space — a tangible emptiness — turns out to be the actual center of the work. Opposites and contradictions, as well as the complex dialectic between them, are the fundamental themes. The orchestration of material and light, presence and absence, things found and things formed, all resist clear fixation, thereby maintaining and creating works with their own non-derivable reality.

The primary material organization is found wood that forms the base for color built with pigment and beeswax. The wood is harvested from urban debris at building constructions and deconstructions, and in its worn and deteriorated condition, creates an instant history. These structures become the foundation for an architecture of color in which the material is color, and the color is material. Built by suspending varying degrees of pigment in layer over thin layer of beeswax, light travels into the wax and encircles the pigment. This results in light reactivity, and juxtaposed to the static, aged structure of the wood, the sculptures’ pigmented wax evolves and adapts to changing ambient light situations. These sculptures hold light.
Light Reactive Organic Sculptures comprise an extensive body of work that has evolved over the past two decades. The work focuses on reductive investigations at the intersection of sculpture and painting, and explores the continuously shifting relationship between light and material. Despite an elemental material vocabulary — found wood, beeswax and pigment — the work’s physical constellation becomes both the carrier of an explicitly painterly event, while also being the foundation of an immaterial phenomenon. The pieces are often examinations of phenomenological processes, where a hollow or empty space — a tangible emptiness — turns out to be the actual center of the work. Opposites and contradictions, as well as the complex dialectic between them, are the fundamental themes. The orchestration of material and light, presence and absence, things found and things formed, all resist clear fixation, thereby maintaining and creating works with their own non-derivable reality.

The primary material organization is found wood that forms the base for color built with pigment and beeswax. The wood is harvested from urban debris at building constructions and deconstructions, and in its worn and deteriorated condition, creates an instant history. These structures become the foundation for an architecture of color in which the material is color, and the color is material. Built by suspending varying degrees of pigment in layer over thin layer of beeswax, light travels into the wax and encircles the pigment. This results in light reactivity, and juxtaposed to the static, aged structure of the wood, the sculptures’ pigmented wax evolves and adapts to changing ambient light situations. These sculptures hold light.
Light Reactive Organic Sculptures comprise an extensive body of work that has evolved over the past two decades. The work focuses on reductive investigations at the intersection of sculpture and painting, and explores the continuously shifting relationship between light and material. Despite an elemental material vocabulary — found wood, beeswax and pigment — the work’s physical constellation becomes both the carrier of an explicitly painterly event, while also being the foundation of an immaterial phenomenon. The pieces are often examinations of phenomenological processes, where a hollow or empty space — a tangible emptiness — turns out to be the actual center of the work. Opposites and contradictions, as well as the complex dialectic between them, are the fundamental themes. The orchestration of material and light, presence and absence, things found and things formed, all resist clear fixation, thereby maintaining and creating works with their own non-derivable reality.

The primary material organization is found wood that forms the base for color built with pigment and beeswax. The wood is harvested from urban debris at building constructions and deconstructions, and in its worn and deteriorated condition, creates an instant history. These structures become the foundation for an architecture of color in which the material is color, and the color is material. Built by suspending varying degrees of pigment in layer over thin layer of beeswax, light travels into the wax and encircles the pigment. This results in light reactivity, and juxtaposed to the static, aged structure of the wood, the sculptures’ pigmented wax evolves and adapts to changing ambient light situations. These sculptures hold light.
Light Reactive Organic Sculptures comprise an extensive body of work that has evolved over the past two decades. The work focuses on reductive investigations at the intersection of sculpture and painting, and explores the continuously shifting relationship between light and material. Despite an elemental material vocabulary — found wood, beeswax and pigment — the work’s physical constellation becomes both the carrier of an explicitly painterly event, while also being the foundation of an immaterial phenomenon. The pieces are often examinations of phenomenological processes, where a hollow or empty space — a tangible emptiness — turns out to be the actual center of the work. Opposites and contradictions, as well as the complex dialectic between them, are the fundamental themes. The orchestration of material and light, presence and absence, things found and things formed, all resist clear fixation, thereby maintaining and creating works with their own non-derivable reality.

The primary material organization is found wood that forms the base for color built with pigment and beeswax. The wood is harvested from urban debris at building constructions and deconstructions, and in its worn and deteriorated condition, creates an instant history. These structures become the foundation for an architecture of color in which the material is color, and the color is material. Built by suspending varying degrees of pigment in layer over thin layer of beeswax, light travels into the wax and encircles the pigment. This results in light reactivity, and juxtaposed to the static, aged structure of the wood, the sculptures’ pigmented wax evolves and adapts to changing ambient light situations. These sculptures hold light.
Light Reactive Organic Sculptures comprise an extensive body of work that has evolved over the past two decades. The work focuses on reductive investigations at the intersection of sculpture and painting, and explores the continuously shifting relationship between light and material. Despite an elemental material vocabulary — found wood, beeswax and pigment — the work’s physical constellation becomes both the carrier of an explicitly painterly event, while also being the foundation of an immaterial phenomenon. The pieces are often examinations of phenomenological processes, where a hollow or empty space — a tangible emptiness — turns out to be the actual center of the work. Opposites and contradictions, as well as the complex dialectic between them, are the fundamental themes. The orchestration of material and light, presence and absence, things found and things formed, all resist clear fixation, thereby maintaining and creating works with their own non-derivable reality.

The primary material organization is found wood that forms the base for color built with pigment and beeswax. The wood is harvested from urban debris at building constructions and deconstructions, and in its worn and deteriorated condition, creates an instant history. These structures become the foundation for an architecture of color in which the material is color, and the color is material. Built by suspending varying degrees of pigment in layer over thin layer of beeswax, light travels into the wax and encircles the pigment. This results in light reactivity, and juxtaposed to the static, aged structure of the wood, the sculptures’ pigmented wax evolves and adapts to changing ambient light situations. These sculptures hold light.
Light Reactive Organic Sculptures comprise an extensive body of work that has evolved over the past two decades. The work focuses on reductive investigations at the intersection of sculpture and painting, and explores the continuously shifting relationship between light and material. Despite an elemental material vocabulary — found wood, beeswax and pigment — the work’s physical constellation becomes both the carrier of an explicitly painterly event, while also being the foundation of an immaterial phenomenon. The pieces are often examinations of phenomenological processes, where a hollow or empty space — a tangible emptiness — turns out to be the actual center of the work. Opposites and contradictions, as well as the complex dialectic between them, are the fundamental themes. The orchestration of material and light, presence and absence, things found and things formed, all resist clear fixation, thereby maintaining and creating works with their own non-derivable reality.

The primary material organization is found wood that forms the base for color built with pigment and beeswax. The wood is harvested from urban debris at building constructions and deconstructions, and in its worn and deteriorated condition, creates an instant history. These structures become the foundation for an architecture of color in which the material is color, and the color is material. Built by suspending varying degrees of pigment in layer over thin layer of beeswax, light travels into the wax and encircles the pigment. This results in light reactivity, and juxtaposed to the static, aged structure of the wood, the sculptures’ pigmented wax evolves and adapts to changing ambient light situations. These sculptures hold light.
Light Reactive Organic Sculptures comprise an extensive body of work that has evolved over the past two decades. The work focuses on reductive investigations at the intersection of sculpture and painting, and explores the continuously shifting relationship between light and material. Despite an elemental material vocabulary — found wood, beeswax and pigment — the work’s physical constellation becomes both the carrier of an explicitly painterly event, while also being the foundation of an immaterial phenomenon. The pieces are often examinations of phenomenological processes, where a hollow or empty space — a tangible emptiness — turns out to be the actual center of the work. Opposites and contradictions, as well as the complex dialectic between them, are the fundamental themes. The orchestration of material and light, presence and absence, things found and things formed, all resist clear fixation, thereby maintaining and creating works with their own non-derivable reality.

The primary material organization is found wood that forms the base for color built with pigment and beeswax. The wood is harvested from urban debris at building constructions and deconstructions, and in its worn and deteriorated condition, creates an instant history. These structures become the foundation for an architecture of color in which the material is color, and the color is material. Built by suspending varying degrees of pigment in layer over thin layer of beeswax, light travels into the wax and encircles the pigment. This results in light reactivity, and juxtaposed to the static, aged structure of the wood, the sculptures’ pigmented wax evolves and adapts to changing ambient light situations. These sculptures hold light.
Light Reactive Organic Sculptures comprise an extensive body of work that has evolved over the past two decades. The work focuses on reductive investigations at the intersection of sculpture and painting, and explores the continuously shifting relationship between light and material. Despite an elemental material vocabulary — found wood, beeswax and pigment — the work’s physical constellation becomes both the carrier of an explicitly painterly event, while also being the foundation of an immaterial phenomenon. The pieces are often examinations of phenomenological processes, where a hollow or empty space — a tangible emptiness — turns out to be the actual center of the work. Opposites and contradictions, as well as the complex dialectic between them, are the fundamental themes. The orchestration of material and light, presence and absence, things found and things formed, all resist clear fixation, thereby maintaining and creating works with their own non-derivable reality.

The primary material organization is found wood that forms the base for color built with pigment and beeswax. The wood is harvested from urban debris at building constructions and deconstructions, and in its worn and deteriorated condition, creates an instant history. These structures become the foundation for an architecture of color in which the material is color, and the color is material. Built by suspending varying degrees of pigment in layer over thin layer of beeswax, light travels into the wax and encircles the pigment. This results in light reactivity, and juxtaposed to the static, aged structure of the wood, the sculptures’ pigmented wax evolves and adapts to changing ambient light situations. These sculptures hold light.
Light Reactive Organic Sculptures comprise an extensive body of work that has evolved over the past two decades. The work focuses on reductive investigations at the intersection of sculpture and painting, and explores the continuously shifting relationship between light and material. Despite an elemental material vocabulary — found wood, beeswax and pigment — the work’s physical constellation becomes both the carrier of an explicitly painterly event, while also being the foundation of an immaterial phenomenon. The pieces are often examinations of phenomenological processes, where a hollow or empty space — a tangible emptiness — turns out to be the actual center of the work. Opposites and contradictions, as well as the complex dialectic between them, are the fundamental themes. The orchestration of material and light, presence and absence, things found and things formed, all resist clear fixation, thereby maintaining and creating works with their own non-derivable reality.

The primary material organization is found wood that forms the base for color built with pigment and beeswax. The wood is harvested from urban debris at building constructions and deconstructions, and in its worn and deteriorated condition, creates an instant history. These structures become the foundation for an architecture of color in which the material is color, and the color is material. Built by suspending varying degrees of pigment in layer over thin layer of beeswax, light travels into the wax and encircles the pigment. This results in light reactivity, and juxtaposed to the static, aged structure of the wood, the sculptures’ pigmented wax evolves and adapts to changing ambient light situations. These sculptures hold light.

Light Reactive Organic Sculptures comprise an extensive body of work that has evolved over the past two decades. The work focuses on reductive investigations at the intersection of sculpture and painting, and explores the continuously shifting relationship between light and material. Despite an elemental material vocabulary — found wood, beeswax and pigment — the work’s physical constellation becomes both the carrier of an explicitly painterly event, while also being the foundation of an immaterial phenomenon. The pieces are often examinations of phenomenological processes, where a hollow or empty space — a tangible emptiness — turns out to be the actual center of the work. Opposites and contradictions, as well as the complex dialectic between them, are the fundamental themes. The orchestration of material and light, presence and absence, things found and things formed, all resist clear fixation, thereby maintaining and creating works with their own non-derivable reality.

The primary material organization is found wood that forms the base for color built with pigment and beeswax. The wood is harvested from urban debris at building constructions and deconstructions, and in its worn and deteriorated condition, creates an instant history. These structures become the foundation for an architecture of color in which the material is color, and the color is material. Built by suspending varying degrees of pigment in layer over thin layer of beeswax, light travels into the wax and encircles the pigment. This results in light reactivity, and juxtaposed to the static, aged structure of the wood, the sculptures’ pigmented wax evolves and adapts to changing ambient light situations. These sculptures hold light.

Situated on a large forested site, Johannes Girardoni’s Infinite Room is a light and sound sculpture that functions as both art and architecture. It is the result of a collaborative effort to situate Girardoni's atmospheric sculpture within the context of a building designed by architect Tom Kundig. Both architect and artist have considered the natural site as a whole, as well as the specific conditions of the sculpture and the building, to place art and architecture in a dynamic relationship to each other, as well as to the site. The project is currently in progress and scheduled to be completed 2013.

The Infinite Room was conceived as a continuously changing environment, in which natural light – the only light source for the space – falls within the room’s curvilinear geometry, appearing to dematerialize it's inner structure. The space is elliptical in plan and absent of any corner geometry. Light flows in through a circular aperture from above and refracts off the Infinite Room’s velvet smooth, white interior shell. The sculpture's inside is built with slaked like – a pure white inorganic compound – that harnesses natural light and scatters it inside the sculpture’s complex geometry, blurring the border between matter and light. At the same time, sensors measure the amount of light in the space, and rearticulate the light as physical sound by converting light waves into sound waves. Girardoni’s architecture of both natural and virtual structures, layered on top of one another, create a multi-sensory, immersive environment of phenomenological events and digital systems. Matter becomes light and light becomes sound. Ultimately, in the heart of this setting, the Infinite Room questions the border of natural and artificial phenomena.

Girardoni created the dimensional and geometric specifications of the sculpture, which Kundig then developed into architecture. Kundig designed and oversaw fabrication of the raw steel shell that forms the sculpture’s void, exposing the work’s interior in its outer form. The steel shell of the sculpture represents a singular, physical manifestation of an artist-architect collaboration, through which the artwork’s conceptual and physical structure has been realized as an architectural expression. Girardoni’s sculpture on the inside and Kundig’s architecture on the outside set up ephemeral and experiential conditions that are deliberately in opposition to one another. Kundig sourced the rough physicality of the house directly from the site’s raw nature – the dominant wall opposite the sculpture is built from stacked granite boulders collected from the site. This central spine starkly contrasts Girardoni’s pure white, light-filled space. Moving from the open setting of the natural site, through Kundig’s rugged house, and finally into the Infinite Room, which Girardoni has you enter through a low and narrow opening tightly scaled to fit a person, is a physical and mental transition, one that begs visitors to shift from reflecting on nature, to tuning in to experience the limits of one’s sensory apparatus.

Metaspace V2, 2012

Dimension: 14’ L x 9’ W x 9’ H (425cm L x 275cm W x 275cm H)

Medium: Interactive light and sound sculpture with raw aluminum, fiberglass, resin, LEDs, sensors with Spectro-Sonic Re-frequencer

Project Abstract:

Metaspace V2 is an interactive sculpture that converts light frequencies to sound, making light audible through Spectro-Sonic re-frequencing. A raw aluminum shell provides the framework for the sculpture’s seamless interior skin. The sculpture is entered through a low and narrow opening. Inside, the space expands into an immersive light and sound environment that continuously evolves. A mix of natural and colored LED light enters the space through a resin lense at the top of the sculpture. The curvilinear geometry of the work scatters the colored light inside, in effect dematerializing physical boundaries and creating a pure color space. Sensors measure the light frequencies of the specific color and drive a tone generator that converts the frequencies of light into frequencies of sound. The visceral sound vibration shifts and modulates as the light condition changes. The sensors also register the presence of visitors’ movement in the space, which changes the progression and speed of the color sequence and hence the sound. In this set-up, virtual and physical information is processed both by visitors and the installation, creating a feedback loop between viewer and the work.

Natural and virtual structures, layered on top of one another, create a multi-sensory, immersive environment of phenomenological events and digital systems. Matter becomes light and light becomes sound. Ultimately, at the core of this setting, Metaspace V2 questions the border of natural and artificial phenomena.
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Metaspace V2, 2012

Dimension: 14’ L x 9’ W x 9’ H (425cm L x 275cm W x 275cm H)

Medium: Interactive light and sound sculpture with raw aluminum, fiberglass, resin, LEDs, sensors with Spectro-Sonic Re-frequencer

Project Abstract:

Metaspace V2 is an interactive sculpture that converts light frequencies to sound, making light audible through Spectro-Sonic re-frequencing. A raw aluminum shell provides the framework for the sculpture’s seamless interior skin. The sculpture is entered through a low and narrow opening. Inside, the space expands into an immersive light and sound environment that continuously evolves. A mix of natural and colored LED light enters the space through a resin lense at the top of the sculpture. The curvilinear geometry of the work scatters the colored light inside, in effect dematerializing physical boundaries and creating a pure color space. Sensors measure the light frequencies of the specific color and drive a tone generator that converts the frequencies of light into frequencies of sound. The visceral sound vibration shifts and modulates as the light condition changes. The sensors also register the presence of visitors’ movement in the space, which changes the progression and speed of the color sequence and hence the sound. In this set-up, virtual and physical information is processed both by visitors and the installation, creating a feedback loop between viewer and the work.

Natural and virtual structures, layered on top of one another, create a multi-sensory, immersive environment of phenomenological events and digital systems. Matter becomes light and light becomes sound. Ultimately, at the core of this setting, Metaspace V2 questions the border of natural and artificial phenomena.
Chromasonic Field–Blue/Green is an interactive installation that explores the convergence of physical material and light by rearticulating light as sound through Spectro-Sonic refrequencing. The installation’s architecture questions the limits of perception and activates the border area of natural phenomena and digital systems. A series of semi-translucent, blue/green cast resin beams are installed in the space. These elements project artificial light out into the space, while letting natural light flow in. Natural and artificial light merge inside the resin beams appearing to subtly shift in color and luminosity depending on the viewer’s position within the space and the given light situation at the time. During bright daylight, the resin seems to suspend natural and artificial light within the material; in low light situations, a blue-green ambient glow emerges from the resin and fills the space. Sensors, calibrated to measure both the color frequencies emanating from the resin and the daylight frequencies in the space, drive a tone generator which converts the frequencies of light into frequencies of sound, making light audible. The sensors also register the presence viewers moving through the space, which additionally modulates the sound. In this set-up, virtual and physical information are processed by both the viewer and the work, blurring the boundary between phenomenological and virtual events.
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