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    • Dripbox - Cadmium Yellow Deep
    • Beeswax, pigment, wood
    • 29 3/4 x 36 x 11 in. 
    • 75.57 x 91.44 x 27.94 cm
    • 2004
      Collection of the Harvard Art Museums


Light Reactive Organic Sculptures comprise an extensive body of work that has evolved over the past two decades. The work focuses on reductive investigations at the intersection of sculpture and painting, and explores the continuously shifting relationship between light and material. Despite an elemental material vocabulary — found wood, beeswax and pigment — the work’s physical constellation becomes both the carrier of an explicitly painterly event, while also being the foundation of an immaterial phenomenon. The pieces are often examinations of phenomenological processes, where a hollow or empty space — a tangible emptiness — turns out to be the actual center of the work. Opposites and contradictions, as well as the complex dialectic between them, are the fundamental themes. The orchestration of material and light, presence and absence, things found and things formed, all resist clear fixation, thereby maintaining and creating works with their own non-derivable reality.

The primary material organization is found wood that forms the base for color built with pigment and beeswax. The wood is harvested from urban debris at building constructions and deconstructions, and in its worn and deteriorated condition, creates an instant history. These structures become the foundation for an architecture of color in which the material is color, and the color is material. Built by suspending varying degrees of pigment in layer over thin layer of beeswax, light travels into the wax and encircles the pigment. This results in light reactivity, and juxtaposed to the static, aged structure of the wood, the sculptures’ pigmented wax evolves and adapts to changing ambient light situations. These sculptures hold light.